How to make choji oil

how to make choji oil

Affordable Choji Oil Substitutes

Jun 06,  · So after learning about Choji Oil from Old Physics, LadyThud had this idea to make our own, but to use Rose Oil instead of Clove oil, so we could have the prettiest smelling Busses out there. I'm including some pics, because we all know what good a thread without them is. My roses aren't in bloom atm, so this example is pretty torn up. Jul 16,  · A 10 to 1 ratio on the mineral oil to clove oil sounds very. high to me (too much clove oil). I just put about 5 ml (1 teaspoon) in a pint of mineral oil. All the clove oil does is give a nice. aroma. It really serves no protective purpose that I know of. and too much could make things a bit gummy as the clove oil. eventually dries on the blade.

This is a two part question and since none are strong enough to stand on their own - I decided to combine them. After reading, studying and attending nihonto seminars for the past 5 years, I finally purchased my first tanto.

I've been using a Paul Chen cleaning kit because of its availability and general "better" quality feel to it but after doing a bit of literature reading, I read that one can make their own choji oil.

I read that mineral oil can be comibined with clove oil in a ratio of 10 to 1 to produce choji oil. I was able to purchase mineral oil at a local pharmacy but the only clove oil I could find was clove bud oil.

I was wondering if this is an acceptable substitute? The second part of my question deals with a translation. I have attached a copy of the registration papers that came with the tanto. My local attempts to translate them have failed and if anyone could provide a top level translation, I would be most greatful.

Hi Guys, I tried that once. Mixing clove oil with machine oil light. The two were not miscible and stayed in seperate layers. Coincidentally trying to be traditional I had used pure clove oil on a shinken.

It seemed to go purplish coloured but did not stain the blade, although I discontiued its use, just in case. The paper is a registration which was issued by Tokyo How to find my facebook public profile url Government Board of Education on April 28th of The features of the blade are described on it. Hi Rich, You have me there. I was under the impression that oil for lubrication of machinery was machine oil whether natural oils like rapeseed, synthetic or petroleum derived mineral oil.

I could see the clove oil perhaps mixing with a plant sourced oil. Anyway I just buy it now. Muriyama, thank you very much for the translation, it will help guide me on my quest to find out more about the tanto. A signed tang is a great start and I look forward to continuing my research.

I did have a question relative to proper cleaning: What is the most practical material that one should use for removal of old oil, uchicko powder and the application of new oil. Is rice paper ok for all three as long as it's crumpled first or is sterile gauze the prefered choice? Any high quality tissue will work, wp40 lubricant instead of choji oil and benzene instead of uchiko.

Generally, Chyoji oil has been used to treat Japanese swords. This is a sticky vegetable oil traditionally used in cleaning swords.

It promotes ozidization of the blade that will result in rust in the future. In our opinion, and based on our experience.

We not advise you to use chyoji oil. We suggest that you use high-quality machine oil on your sword. This is the same type what are ceramides in skin care when maintaining guns or sewing machines, and it is the only oil that we use with our swords at Aoi Art.

A kind of Japanese paper called nugiu-gami can be used to wipe off the swords, but we find that high quality tissues work just as well. If you appreciate the same sword frequently, it is not always necessary to repeat this entire process. The Japanese sword does not rust easily, so it is not necessary to apply uchi-ko too often.

In fact, using the uchiko too frequently could result in slight scratches and over time the texture of the jitetsu will lose its brightness. Please realize that the uchi-ko is made of a fine powdered whetstone known as uchigumori-to. Occasional care and caution when maintaining your sword is good. Excessive cleaning however, will cause damage, so please be careful. First I have heard about WD Registration question. Unless I am mistaken, Fuyuhiro worked in the mid s.

How is it possible that the era is Meito late s? Is it possible it's refering to the school? First, you should look at the mei on the nakago. The mei on the registration is usually identical with the mei on the nakago.

But I think the description on the paper is rather strange. There might be omission. Thanks for the photo. But it does not seem to be so important. In either case, it is strange that the name was chiseled at that position of the mei, and moreover, it looks to have been added later to me. I also suspect the genuineness of the mei because it looks a little crude.

The mei does in fact appear to have been engraved, ie; actually cut into the nakago. Genuine mei are chased, this is more of a matter of pushing the metal out of the way of the punch rather than cutting it away. The edges of the kanji strokes are generally how to make choji oil raised as a result. Obviously much older swords may have this feature worn down but you may still see the characteristic overlapping, elongated punch marks in the groove.

I see what you are saying, the first two kanji do appear significantly different than the rest. It could be possible that they were added later to predate the blade or perhaps the entire mei could be faked. The blade has a horimono that looks quite different from the mei. I've attached a few pictures that may help. The carving my have been done to cover up ware. Although I can't say I like what you are saying - it sounds like the truth.

My gut instinct pointed me in that direction but my lack of expertise couldn't provide any substantial claims. The mei didn't look ideal either. What more could I ask for? Not sure how much it's worth now but I never bought it as an investment. In the past week, I've already learned a ton - something that five years of book reading cannot substitute for Also proves my previously thought philosophy: It's hard to argue with facts. You can post now and register later.

If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account. Paste as plain text instead. Only 75 emoji are allowed. Display as a link instead. Clear editor. Upload or insert images from URL. Japan News. Click here. Sign in to follow this Followers 0. Reply to this topic Start new topic. Recommended Posts. Humbleshogun 0. Report post 1. Posted July how to grow curry leaf tree, Share this post Link to post Share on other sites.

Rich S Report post 2. A 10 to 1 ratio on the mineral oil to clove oil sounds very high to me too much clove oil. I just put about 5 ml 1 teaspoon in a pint of mineral oil. All the clove oil does is give a nice aroma. It really serves no protective purpose that I know of and too much could make things a bit gummy as the clove oil eventually dries on the blade.

Rich S. John A Stuart 1, Report post 3. Posted July 2, Nobody 1, Report post 4. Posted July 3, Type: tanto Blade length: Report post 5.

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Dec 13,  · In addition to applying choji oil, there are other steps you can take to preserve and protect your katana, including the following: Store the katana in a sheath with the blade's cutting edge facing upward Wash and dry hands before holding or using the katana Avoid touching the blade with your bare. Gun oil; 3-in-1 oil; Mineral oil; Machine oil; Automotive oil--thicker viscosities--example EP90 gear oil; Apply the oil liberally to the blade, and then wipe the excess off until you have a thin, even film coating the surface. These basics and materials should tide you over until you get a "real kit" if you ever in fact see the need to get one at all. Apr 05,  · Did a little more research and found "choji oil", which is just mineral oil with Clove oil (or Camelia oil) added. Seems to be the oil to use on Japanese katanas. Got a girlfriend who's into aromatherapy, she found me some clove oil, and I put a bit into the gallon jug (probably not more than a third of an ounce).

Like all swords, the Japanese katana requires regular maintenance and care to preserve its integrity. When neglected, an otherwise pristine katana may develop rust and corrosion. Granted, minor instances of "surface rust" can be buffed and polished out. If the rust has settled deep into the blade's steel, however, this may not be an option. Thankfully, there are ways to protect a katana from rust and corrosion, including the use of choji oil. Choji oil is a special type of oil that's designed specifically for protecting and preserving swords and other bladed weapons.

It originated in feudal Japan many centuries ago, during which samurai warriors would use it to protect their swords from rust. Even after all those years, though, little has changed regarding choji oil or the way in which it's used.

So, what is choji oil exactly? While its composition varies, it typically consists of a combination of clove oil extract and mineral oil at a ratio of to , respectively. This combination results in a superior oil that's highly effective at protecting swords like the katana from rusting.

When applied to a katana -- or any bladed weapon for that matter -- choji oil creates a barrier of protection between the steel and the outside elements. You see, a katana develops rust as a result of oxidation from moisture. When moisture reaches the blade, it reacts with iron to form a new metal known as iron oxide rust. Applying choji oil to a katana is a relatively simple and straight-forward process. Assuming the blade has already been cleaned, you can apply the oil using a soft flannel cloth.

Alternatively, nuguigami tissue can be used to apply choji oil. Unlike flannel cloth, however, nuguigami tissue is only good for a single use, after which it must be replaced.

In addition to applying choji oil, there are other steps you can take to preserve and protect your katana, including the following:. Sold Out. Japanese Katanas. Korean Jingums. Training Swords. Maintenance Parts. Overview of Choji Oil Choji oil is a special type of oil that's designed specifically for protecting and preserving swords and other bladed weapons.

Other Tips for Katana Maintenance In addition to applying choji oil, there are other steps you can take to preserve and protect your katana, including the following: Store the katana in a sheath with the blade's cutting edge facing upward Wash and dry hands before holding or using the katana Avoid touching the blade with your bare hands or fingers Monitor and regulate the humidity of the environment in which your katana is stored Photo credit: soomness.

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